#FFFaceoff Inspirations

Through Erin’s latest outfit post–how cute is that ’90s-esque flower dress?–I found out about the Fall Fashion Faceoff that Kelly of Masque Mag has organized. I have a few outfits in mind for the challenge, and I’ll be posting them soon! (Hint: there will be some plaid/leopard mixing, and some good times with multiple black-and-white-florals.)

In the meantime, here are some Polyvore collages I created inspired by the aesthetic(s) of the challenge. You can click the images for more information.

The Dark Side of Floral
Back to (Punk Rock) School
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Friday Links 9/27/13

If you read one thing this week, make it Rachel Cohen-Ruttenberg’s essay Shame and disconnection: the missing voices of oppression in Brene Brown’s “The Power of Vulnerability.” A taste:

People from any marginalized group can do all the personal work on themselves they want, but that work is not going to magically get them off the margins and connected into the larger society. If you’re on the margins, it’s not your attitude that’s got you disconnected. It’s stigma and systemic exclusion. I can be the most psychologically healthy, spiritually evolved, kick-ass disabled person on the planet, and that is not going to solve the social, sensory, and architectural barriers that enforce my disconnection from the able-bodied world every single day.

She also has a great follow-up post, Connection takes more than courage.

Now, on to the rest of the links…

Fa(t)shion
-s.e. writes about the problem of greenwashing in the fashion industry.
-The Frugal Fatshionista reviews Light in the Box, which sells inexpensive formalwear in both straight and plus sizes.
-These indie nail polishes and lipsticks look fabulous.
-I love the clothes in Skorch’s Plus Night Out Recap.

Amber Riley = the awesomest. She’s so adorable and such a great dancer!

Fat Acceptance
-Shannon talks about what things changed–and what didn’t–when she unintentionally lost weight.
Four fat-positive Netflix picks (and one you should avoid).
-Why “fat-phobia is the last acceptable prejudice” is such bullshit.
-Ragini writes about the recurrence of her eating disorder and her experience with extreme fatphobia in her native India.
-Sonya Renee reflects on the invisibility of women of color within the fat acceptance movement.
What about really fat people with health problems?
-If you don’t want to become enraged and incredibly sad, avoid these three pieces: a special report on medical fatphobia,  one woman’s experience with a weight-loss-encouraging workplace wellness program–while she was fighting a life-threatening eating disorder, and the terrifying story of a man who died after he was refused medical treatment based on his weight. This is why we fight.

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Feminist Hulk smash the devaluation of pink collar work: on gender, value, and opportunity

Sarah Kendzior’s latest piece on poverty and workers’ rights is, as always, full of truth. The whole thing is a must-read–seriously, I’ll wait, go read it and then come back–but one part in particular resonated with me:

Teaching, nursing, social work, childcare and other “pink collar” professions do not pay poorly because, as Slate’s Hanna Rosin argues, women “flock to less prestigious jobs”, but because jobs are considered less prestigious when they are worked by women. The jobs are not worth less – but the people who work them are supposed to be. 

I’ve been ranting about this for so many years.

So many of the men in my life have high-paying computer programming jobs, and so many of the women in my life have low-paying teaching and childcare jobs. I’ve worked in childcare myself, and let me tell you, it’s hard.

Having conversations at the toddler level all day is a special kind of mind-numbing. Spending all day in a room full of crying infants is a special kind of nerve-jangling. And sometimes you get peed on. (I learned the hard way to keep everything covered when changing baby boys’ diapers.)

There are the good moments too: when four toddlers are trying to fit in your lap for story time, when you’re out on a walk with the kids and one of them makes an observation and you see so much intelligence, so much creativity, so much promise just beginning to blossom. There are fun times with bubbles and balls and finger paint. There’s a playfulness you don’t get in the average office job.

But overall, it’s incredibly hard work–and vital to a well-functioning society, and laughably underpaid.  Or it would be laughable, if it weren’t so serious an indictment of our nation’s priorities.

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It’s time for a pro-life economy (no, not that kind of pro-life)

From the tragic story of adjunct professor Margaret Mary Vojtko’s death to my own adventures in job insecurity, everything I’ve read and experienced has convinced me that we need a pro-life economy.

Not in the traditional anti-abortion sense (ugh), but in the sense of putting human lives first, and profit second. And since our lives are inextricably tied to the health of our planet, we need to prioritize that too.

We need jobs. Green jobs, well-paid jobs, jobs with benefits (or government systems to provide those benefits).

We need an end to the ideology of infinite growth–which, in a world of finite resources, is quite literally unsustainable–and a focus on human health and happiness.

We need an end to the casual cruelty of corporate capitalism–the callous profit-seeking that allowed an adjunct professor to die penniless, near-homeless, and uninsured while the university’s president received a $700,000 salary.

Bill McKibben succinctly summed up what’s wrong with our economic system in his 2007 book Deep Economy: the Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future:

Alongside the exhilaration of the flattening earth celebrated by Thomas Friedman, the planet (and our country) in fact contains increasing numbers of flattened people, flattened by the very forces that are making a few others wildly rich.

His observation is even more true now than when he first made it, back in the less-shitty days before the Great Financial Crisis.

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Sunday links, 9/22/13

Fa(t)shion
-Huzzah! Re/Dress Cleveland is now open. In other exciting Re/Dress news, the iconic Size Queen rainbow zebra dress is now available on their site.
-The Phatshion Peacock hung out in a a fatkini under a waterfall, and the resulting pictures are gorgeous.
-So much nostalgia: the 27 most ’90s outfits worn on Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
-Good news: ASOS Curve has expanded their sizes range to include size 24, which could actually fit women who wear up to a 26-28 since their sizing runs large.
-I love these portraits of women who sell African print fabric in London.

Fat Acceptance
-For the “news that make me want to smash things” files, a toddler in Saudi Arabia was given weight-loss surgery. Fuck.
Fat as a metaphor: don’t do that, everyone will know you’re fat!
Fat kids and formerly-fat kids are at significant risk of eating disorders, yet are more likely to go undiagnosed and untreated.
-So much yes to this quote about the hot fat girl revolution.
-Ragen discusses ways to increase mobility regardless of size.

Everything Else
When your (brown) body is a (white) wonderland: the best analysis I’ve read yet of the racial dynamics in Miley Cyrus’ VMA performance.
-#IAmMargaretMary.
Who is a “journalist?” People who can afford to be.
-In Norway, prisoners are actually treated like people.
Queered science: why social justice and STEM fields should hang out more often.
Occupy at two: how a flawed and fleeting utopia changed the world.
-Roxane Gay is calling for submissions for her new series at Salon featuring writing by feminists (of any gender) of color.
Fear and loathing (as a 21-year old queer) in Singapore.
-I would love to visit this steampunk coffee shop someday.
-This golden retriever’s puppy’s first visit to the beach is the cutest thing ever.