Sunday links, 5/4/14

calico cat sitting in red lawn chair on a porch

My feline friend Sophie, who likes to come hang out on my porch.

Happy Star Wars Day–May the Fourth be with you! šŸ˜‰

Fa(t)shion
Johnny Weir’s hat just won the Kentucky Derby.
(85 pieces of) proof that you can rock a bikini at any size!
-I love the Big Fat Flea’s fatshion features, and I hope to make it to their event someday.
-These gender neutral children’s clothes are great.
-Nicki Minaj = fashion inspiration forever.
-Leah reviews the Big Bloomers Company anti-chub-rub shorts. I’ve had good luck with similar shorts from the Thigh Society.
How to rock a tulle skirt without looking like you’re in a ballerina costume.

Fat Acceptance
-Two awesome fat events coming up in California: Fatty Fun in the Sun in Oakland, and Second Helpings Visual Art Exhibition and Performance Fatinee in San Francisco.
-The latter event needs some support to make it possible. Two other fat-related projects that could use your support: the Fired Fat Girl Travel Fund, and the Fat Nutritionist’s goal of becoming a radical dietician. (How messed-up is it that becoming a dietician requires a more-than-full-time, nine-month-long unpaid internship? Michelle shouldn’t have to turn to the internet to be able to pursue her chosenĀ career.)
Read Gabourey Sidibe’s wonderful speech from the Ms. Foundation Gala. Love her!
-Lesley writes about the awesomeness that is the Adipositivity Project.
-Lonie takes on the myth that when you accept your body and stop trying to lose weight, you’ll lose weight.
-I love this way of looking at stretch marks.
Fat acceptance, like Batman, has no limits.

Bellydancing to Adele = awesome.
Continue reading

I believe in fashion.

When I first started reading Web Smith’s piece “The Lost Art of Buying Clothing,” I thought I’d agree with most of it. I’m all for making more durable clothing (especially leggings/pants/shorts that don’t wear out in the thighs–are you listening, plus size clothing manufacturers?). I’m all forĀ moving from the unsustainable fast fashion model to a slower one, one that pays its workers a living wage and doesn’t wreck the planet.

But then I got to this part:

But what about the changing of styles? Rules of thumb: (1) if you donā€™t think youā€™d wear it in seven years, you may want to put it back (2) if the tailoring that you desire is too ā€œinā€, it may be out in a few years (3) and some patterns and colors will remain near the top for a lifetime.Ā See, I do not believe in fashion.Ā IĀ doĀ believe in amazing pieces that remain timeless through the ages.

This is where I disagree.

I believe in fashion.

I believe in playing dress-up, playing with color, texture, pattern, proportion.

I believe in fashion as an accessible art form.

I believe in fashion as a form of self-expression that changes with me. I’m not the same person I was seven years ago–why would I want to dress like her? And who knows what my style will be like in seven years?

There are some trends from my teenage years that I still love–hell, I’d dress like a Delia*sĀ  catalog half the time if I could find that stuff in my size. Ā And I’m all for having a few timeless pieces, like my favorite little black dressĀ (which, for what it’s worth, was a cheap Target buy at least six or seven years ago and is still in great condition). But the thought of buying clothing for the next seven years sounds stifling.

Smith goes on to list five things to consider when buying, which starts with this:

High fashion has its place, 95% of us do not live in that place. Set asideĀ HypebeastĀ trends for classic colors, fits, patterns, and heritage pieces: the blue blazer, the tweed sport coat, the brown slim fit dress pant, the selvedge denim, the oxford, durable point collars, the spread collar for when you need it. You may never be the most ā€œfashionableā€ on the block but you will applaud at your old photos, three years from now.

Continue reading

Friday links 11/1/13

This jack-o-lantern partied a bit too hard.

Happy day-after-Halloween! I hope you all had a good time. Ā I spent the evening watching Cabin in the Woods with a group of friends, and although I don’t usually like horror movies, I loved it! It’s pretty much impossible for Joss Whedon to make anything bad, and it didn’t hurt that the cast was full of great actors.

I also had a Halloween party last weekend, where I dressed up as a steampunk Pikachu (in reference to this comic). I will post pictures soon! Now, on to the linky goodness…

Fa(t)shion
-I don’t mean to turn my blog into a complete advertisement for Domino Dollhouse, but their new skull-print babydoll dress and leggings are too awesome not to post about.
-This photo shoot of five fat babes is fabulous.
-The Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator, a collective workspace focused on sustainable production, will be opening in 2014.
-John Scalzi writes about why he dresses the way he does, and how, as a middle-class white man, he faces less appearance-based judgment than most people.
-Jille Edge’s Flickr has plenty of old-school Delia*s nostalgia.
Politicizing plus size fashion with blogger Brooklyn Boobala.

Fat Acceptance
-There will be a Fat Justice Workshop here in Boston next weekend.
-This fat bellydance DVD looks great.
-Abigail Saguy talks about the history of the “obesity epidemic.”
Fat people need candy too.

Climate and Sustainability
-A must-read from Naomi Klein: how science is telling us all to revolt.
-The Transition Lab, which trains ordinary people to create a resilient future, sounds amazing. If any of my fellow Bostonians want to learn more, check out the presentations they will be giving in Cambridge next week.
-A great overview of what a post-growth economy means, and why we need one.

Continue reading

Feminist Hulk smash the devaluation of pink collar work: on gender, value, and opportunity

Sarah Kendzior’s latest pieceĀ on poverty and workers’ rights is, as always, full of truth. The whole thing is a must-read–seriously, I’ll wait, go read it and then come back–but one part in particular resonated with me:

Teaching, nursing, social work, childcare and otherĀ “pink collar”Ā professions do not pay poorly because, as Slate’s Hanna RosinĀ argues, women “flock to less prestigious jobs”, but because jobs are considered less prestigious when they are worked by women. The jobs are not worth less ā€“ but the people who work them are supposed to be.Ā 

I’ve been ranting about this for so many years.

So many of the men in my life have high-paying computer programming jobs, and so many of the women in my life have low-paying teaching and childcare jobs. I’ve worked in childcare myself, and let me tell you, it’s hard.

Having conversations at the toddler level all day is a special kind of mind-numbing. Spending all day in a room full of crying infants is a special kind of nerve-jangling.Ā And sometimes you get peed on. (I learned the hard way to keep everything covered when changing baby boys’ diapers.)

There are the good moments too: when four toddlers are trying to fit in your lap for story time, when you’re out on a walk with the kids and one of them makes an observation and you see so much intelligence, so much creativity, so much promise just beginning to blossom. There are fun times with bubbles and balls and finger paint. There’s a playfulness you don’t get in the average office job.

But overall, it’s incredibly hard work–andĀ vital to a well-functioning society, and laughably underpaid. Ā Or it would be laughable, if it weren’t so serious an indictment of our nation’s priorities.

Continue reading

Friday Links, 8/9/13

Mwahahaha! Taken by The Meanwhile Project at Figment Boston.

Fa(t)shion
-Erin has more ideas of things Gabourey Sidibe could have worn in Harper’s Bazaar.
Tripp NYC has a few plus size items available online, and is working on more!
Various exciting fatshion news, including H&M finally selling their clothes online in the US.
Beth Ditto wears Gaultier for her Hawaii wedding, and looks amazing.
-There’s so much fatshion-spiration in Offbeat Bride’s plus size brides Pinterest board.

Fat Acceptance
Virgie Tovar interviews Rachel, a fat-positive personal trainer.
On the necessity for real-world fat communities.
-The book Fatropolis sounds amazing–it’s definitely going on my reading list.
Unintentionally inspirational: the Lumpy Space Princess.
Fat, fibromyalgia, and exercise.

Climate and Sustainability
David Roberts wants to live in a baugruppe, and now I do too.
-A new study shows that today’s technology could be used to power the world with renewable energy–all that’s needed is the political will to do it.
-Bethany uses the Princess Bride as a metaphor for finding the tools to save the world.
Like shopping at local businesses? Now you can invest in them, too.

Everything Else
Immigration is a feminist issue–we need to treat it that way.
-Love this: Dear daughter, I hope you have some fucking awesome sex.
Lady Gaga has a burqa problem. UGH.
-Sarah Kendzior exposes the economic forces behind the myth of “opting out.”
The chronic pain PSA.
Should feminists be critical of compulsory monogamy?
-Two great Captain Awkward posts on online dating and queer romance.
5 tips for calling out transphobia.
How to be an ally to Muslim women: an incomplete starter kit.
Ann Giles’ husband transitioned during their marriage, and 17 years later they’re still in love.
10 thoughts on mental illness, abuse, and survivors.
Hugo Schwyzer and the consumption of redemption narratives.
-A really interesting essay on geek culture.
Visible bodies: transgender narratives retold.
-A beautiful example of doing parenting right: we think he might be a boy.

What have you been reading/writing this week?

Friday Links, 7/19/13

An awesome display I saw in Forever 21.

Happy Friday! This is going to be a long one, but it’s all really good stuff–take your time reading through it.

Fa(t)shion
-Check out the IndieGoGo campaign for WeighTees, a company that will make funny t-shirts in sizes XL through 6X.
Black man in a dress: getting fresh with Wilbert.
The fat chick’s shopping guide for summer style: part II.

Fat Activism
-Fellow Bostonians, I know it’s last-minute, but I just found out about this body-posi beach day at Revere Beach on Sunday! I’ll be there for at least a little while, and I’m going to try to bring some friends–maybe I’ll see you there?
Why we should fight back against non-profits that “fight obesity.”Ā Ā Ugh, I am SO SICK of seeing fat people blamed for everything from global warming and hunger. And I’m glad people are speaking up about it.
I don’t fit in my husband’s shirt. Get over it.
How to take the weight loss industry down.
This week in fat stigma: the Boy Scouts of America have forbidden fat kids from attending their 2013 Jamboree. Blehhh.
-Marianne is back at The Rotund–huzzah!–writing about intersectional fat acceptance, building community, and not being part of the mainstream.
Fat liberation is totally queer. YES!
Big men can bike: meet cyclist Ernest Gagnon.
4 women, 4 words: discussing the words that describe our big bodies.
-Jes rounds up the best body-positive books.

Continue reading

Fashion policing: a playground of oppression

Yeah, I’m wearing leggings as pants. You got a problem with that?

The deeper I get into the fa(t)shion world, the more I come across examples of fashion judging and policing, even within spaces that are explicitly body-positive.

It pisses me off immensely. First, because one person’s style is no one’s business but their own. Period. Second, because it’s inextricably tied up withĀ pretty much every prejudice under the sun: sexism, ableism, ageism, racism, classism, homophobia, transphobia, fatphobia…

Warning: epic rant ahead.

Continue reading