Sunday links, 5/25/14

Y-shaped tree with people making M, C, and A shapes

We found an interesting tree while hiking last weekend…

Fa(t)shion
-I love this fatshionista paper doll.
-If you’re looking to both buy some awesome mermaid-themed jewelry and support a transgender person with Asperger’s who has trouble sustaining traditional employment, check out Earl Foolish.
The fashion victims of Bangladesh.
Wandering the no (wo)man’s land between straight and plus sizes.
Work it! The new face of labor in fashion.
Quvenzhane Wallis is the adorable new face of Armani Junior.
From Lorde to Rihanna to the new Barbie, Goth culture’s comeback is a win for women.
Sheri and Sarah both round up plus size crop tops.
Do this don’t: dress like a fat marshmallow.
-A fascinating conversation on design and systems, both in fashion and in a broader sense.

Fat Acceptance
-Roxy takes apart the ridiculous concept of “glorifying obesity.”
Great postcards for the Abundant Bodies track at the AMC.
-This fat coloring book project looks really cool.
Fat-phobic trolls don’t just want to be rude–they want power over us.
-Check out Hanne Blank’s new body acceptance project, 52 Weeks to Your Best Body Ever.
Discrimination, doxxing, and that ‘Louie’ episode: a Q&A with the filmmakers behind ‘Fattitude.’

Climate and Sustainability
A call to arms for the climate march in New York this September. I will do my best to be there!
-Bill McKibben and a group of climate scientists and activists did an AMA on Reddit.
Solar farms can enhance biodiversity and sequester soil carbon too.
Geothermal: the red hot renewable that could incite a green power revolution.
A blueprint to end paralysis over global action on climate.
Before repairing the climate, we’ll have to repair the effects of racism.

An awesome mashup of two great songs:
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Climate disaster is not a white, middle-class issue: on narratives and the need to build bridges

I’m somewhere in here. (source: 350MA Facebook page)

Last night, I attended a last-minute vigil protesting the Keystone XL pipeline, inspired by the State Department’s release of a report that green-lighted it.

It was heartening to be part of such a large crowd assembled at such short notice–there were over 200 people gathered in Harvard Square alone, and it was one of multiple events in the Boston area. It felt good to sing and chant and hold signs, to make our unequivocal “NO!” to climate destruction heard. It was heartening to feel the warmth of community, of spirited resistance, on a snowy day.

And yet. I looked around at all the white, middle-class, crunchy/hippie/folkie faces and thought, “We’re never going to succeed if we can only appeal to people like ourselves.”

We can only save the world if we can build bridges, if we can build a movement that resonates with people from all walks of life.  Climate disaster is not an issue that affects only canvas-bag-toting, organic-food-eating, voluntary-simplicity-loving liberals–we’re all in this together, and we need to face it together.

(A few caveats: I’m aware that Boston doesn’t represent the international climate movement, so what I’m saying may or may not apply on a larger scale. Also, I’m aware that it’s somewhat hypocritical of me to criticize the whiteness of local climate activism when the fat-positive events I’ve held have also been mostly white. I know it’s a problem, and I am working to change it.) Continue reading

Friday links 11/1/13

This jack-o-lantern partied a bit too hard.

Happy day-after-Halloween! I hope you all had a good time.  I spent the evening watching Cabin in the Woods with a group of friends, and although I don’t usually like horror movies, I loved it! It’s pretty much impossible for Joss Whedon to make anything bad, and it didn’t hurt that the cast was full of great actors.

I also had a Halloween party last weekend, where I dressed up as a steampunk Pikachu (in reference to this comic). I will post pictures soon! Now, on to the linky goodness…

Fa(t)shion
-I don’t mean to turn my blog into a complete advertisement for Domino Dollhouse, but their new skull-print babydoll dress and leggings are too awesome not to post about.
-This photo shoot of five fat babes is fabulous.
-The Brooklyn Fashion and Design Accelerator, a collective workspace focused on sustainable production, will be opening in 2014.
-John Scalzi writes about why he dresses the way he does, and how, as a middle-class white man, he faces less appearance-based judgment than most people.
-Jille Edge’s Flickr has plenty of old-school Delia*s nostalgia.
Politicizing plus size fashion with blogger Brooklyn Boobala.

Fat Acceptance
-There will be a Fat Justice Workshop here in Boston next weekend.
-This fat bellydance DVD looks great.
-Abigail Saguy talks about the history of the “obesity epidemic.”
Fat people need candy too.

Climate and Sustainability
-A must-read from Naomi Klein: how science is telling us all to revolt.
-The Transition Lab, which trains ordinary people to create a resilient future, sounds amazing. If any of my fellow Bostonians want to learn more, check out the presentations they will be giving in Cambridge next week.
-A great overview of what a post-growth economy means, and why we need one.

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Sunday links, 9/22/13

Fa(t)shion
-Huzzah! Re/Dress Cleveland is now open. In other exciting Re/Dress news, the iconic Size Queen rainbow zebra dress is now available on their site.
-The Phatshion Peacock hung out in a a fatkini under a waterfall, and the resulting pictures are gorgeous.
-So much nostalgia: the 27 most ’90s outfits worn on Buffy the Vampire Slayer.
-Good news: ASOS Curve has expanded their sizes range to include size 24, which could actually fit women who wear up to a 26-28 since their sizing runs large.
-I love these portraits of women who sell African print fabric in London.

Fat Acceptance
-For the “news that make me want to smash things” files, a toddler in Saudi Arabia was given weight-loss surgery. Fuck.
Fat as a metaphor: don’t do that, everyone will know you’re fat!
Fat kids and formerly-fat kids are at significant risk of eating disorders, yet are more likely to go undiagnosed and untreated.
-So much yes to this quote about the hot fat girl revolution.
-Ragen discusses ways to increase mobility regardless of size.

Everything Else
When your (brown) body is a (white) wonderland: the best analysis I’ve read yet of the racial dynamics in Miley Cyrus’ VMA performance.
-#IAmMargaretMary.
Who is a “journalist?” People who can afford to be.
-In Norway, prisoners are actually treated like people.
Queered science: why social justice and STEM fields should hang out more often.
Occupy at two: how a flawed and fleeting utopia changed the world.
-Roxane Gay is calling for submissions for her new series at Salon featuring writing by feminists (of any gender) of color.
Fear and loathing (as a 21-year old queer) in Singapore.
-I would love to visit this steampunk coffee shop someday.
-This golden retriever’s puppy’s first visit to the beach is the cutest thing ever.

Further reading on the Zimmerman verdict

There has been so much good, thoughtful writing about the verdict and the social systems that allowed it to happen. Here are a few of the best pieces I’ve come across:

The Zimmerman jury told young black men what we already knew.
It is a complicated thing to be young, black, and male in America. Not only are you well aware that many people are afraid of you—you can see them clutching their purses or stiffening in their subway seats when you sit across from them—you must also remain conscious of the fact that people expect you to be apologetic for their fear. It’s your job to be remorseful about the fact that your very nature makes them uncomfortable, like a pilot having to apologize to a fearful flyer for being in the sky.

White supremacy acquits George Zimmerman.
When Zimmerman was acquitted today, it wasn’t because he’s a so-called white Hispanic. He’s not. It’s because he abides by the logic of white supremacy, and was supported by a defense team—and a swath of society—that supports the lingering idea that some black men must occasionally be killed with impunity in order to keep society-at-large safe.

We are not Trayvon Martin: a Tumblr exploring race and privilege through people’s personal experiences. The creator of the blog explains here why he started it:
So much of the coverage and trial has been about race, Trayvon’s race, and what that meant for him. But all to often those of us who get the benefits of racism can’t see. We can’t see it because the world just appears normal. Living a “normal” life means i don’t have to think about race.
But race shapes my world as much as it shapes Trayvon’s, and it is my responsibility to see that and change that. 

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Friday links, 6/21/13

An awesomely geeky car I saw recently.

Happy Friday! As usual, feel free to link to anything interesting you’ve read or written this week in the comments.

Fa(t)shion
-Lesley rounds up some cute floral print stuff.
Elegance for all: can ModCloth change plus size fashion for good?
-Advanced Style’s photoshoot in Vogue Australia is gorgeous.
We’re here, we’re queer, and we look real cute: indie designers challenging gender norms.
-There’s now a blog for fatshionable apples!
This dress. Oh, this dress! It’s like a giant cupcake and I want one just like it.

Fat Activism
A great interview with Virgie Tovar in both English and German.
This protest outside of a Victoria’s Secret in California, including both Virgie Tovar and Marilyn Wann, is awesome! You can see more pictures here on About-Face’s Facebook page.
-Melissa at Shakesville has yet another addition to the Fatstronauts 101 series, this time taking down the myth that fat people are stupid.
-Are you looking for a part-time internship doing fat activism? Check out the Militant Baker’s call for interns.
Public health does not make me public property.
Death is always a shock: on James Gandolfini and the rush to explain an unexpected loss.
-Two more good analyses of the AMA’s decision, from the Fat Nutritionist and Feed Me, I’m Cranky.

A great takedown of the idea that fat women shouldn’t cosplay thinner characters:

Climate and Sustainability
-The Climate Justice Hub here in Somerville is now open, and it’s an awesome space for community-building and action. If you live in the area, check out their calendar of events.
-Through an event at the CJ Hub, I met Bethany, an amazing writer who blogs about making the world a better place at Granite Bunny. I highly recommend everything she writes, but here are a few places to start: Bicknell’s thrush, Yoga and Montana’s Tongue River Valley, and We’re gonna win.
Local, self-sufficient, optimistic: are transition towns the way forward?

Everything Else
-I recently came across anthropologist Sarah Kendzior‘s writing, and I love all of it. I wish more people were deconstructing our economic system the way she does. A few of my favorite recent pieces: In defense of complaining, The moral bankruptcy of the internship economy, and The unaffordable Baby Boomer dream.
On being a “good” black man, from the perspective of a transgender man who started to face a different kind of racism once he transitioned.
-I love these answers from students about why they need feminism.
On invisible health issues, and the complex space between “healthy” and “disabled.”
Enforcing poverty to access health care.
Why cops don’t believe rape victims, and how brain science can help solve the problem.