Tutus and Tiny Hats turns two (say that three times fast!)

pink azalea glen

A little over two years ago, I was thinking of starting a blog. I had a bunch of things I wanted to write about, but no idea for a cohesive theme–until I settled on fatshion. Over time, my blog has come full circle: starting with fatshion gave me the structure and pressure-free space I needed to start writing about all sorts of other things, from post-growth economics to climate change to sustainable travel.

Just having a place to write opened up a world of thing I needed to say. And it has also made me a more engaged blog reader. I’d been reading blogs since college, when I got deep into the feminist blogosphere (which eventually led me to Shapely Prose and fat acceptance), but rarely commented until I started blogging myself. And after years of haphazard blog-reading, I finally got organized, collecting the blogs I wanted to follow first in Google Reader and then Feedly.

Through blogging, if somewhat indirectly, I’ve gotten involved with my local fat community, and started the Boston Fatties Meetup Facebook group. Having a real-life fat-positive community is awesome, something I could only have imagined back in my Shapely Prose-reading days.

Strangely enough, back when I was so into SP and other fat-o-sphere blogs, I never got into the fatshion side of things. I’m still kicking myself for not joining the Fatshionista LiveJournal back in the day–I’m pretty sure I was at least vaguely aware of it, and I’m not sure why I didn’t think to join. But whether or not I was consciously thinking about fatshion, I always enjoyed dressing up and adorning myself. I can trace my love of clothes back to the (floral skirt show and tell, ll bean catalogs – poring over the rainbows of color options)

I see my blog as a culmination of so many things: my lifetime love of color and adornment, the writing skills I learned in high school and a variety of creative arts camps, the feminist blogs I read endlessly in college, the ways I learned to think about social structures through my sociology classes (especially Wealth and Poverty with Robert Reich).

Sometimes blogging feels almost like writing poetry. Sometimes I recognize that cycle of frustrations and highs from the days of writing papers and essays–that near simultaneous combination of, “Ugghh, I hate writing” and “Woohoo, I love writing!” Other times it’s just about describing what I wore and when I wore it, and that’s ok too. This blog isn’t meant to be a showcase of my best writing; it’s more like a snapshot of my life, including both the eloquent moments and the times when I just want to look at pretty things.

That’s one of the reasons why, a few months ago, I changed my tagline to a famous line from Walt Whitman’s Song of Myself, “I am large, I contain multitudes.” I might change it again at some point. I might even change the name of my blog to better represent the variety of things I write about, although I really do like the name Tutus and Tiny Hats. And of course, I still love actual tutus and tiny hats!

Thank you to everyone who has been a part of this ongoing journey: my readers and commenters, the bloggers who inspire me, everyone who has engaged with my blogging and its real-world extensions in ways large and small. I am so glad to be part of a fabulous, fatshionable, world-bettering community with all of you.

On golden retrievers, potential energy, and tired feet

Yesterday, I came across the above picture of the Energy Exodus, a six-day march for renewable energy currently taking place south of Boston–which I’d take part in, if I weren’t so exhausted from my current job situation. My friend Bethany of Granite Bunny posted it along with the comment, “This looks like fun, which means it’s probably the right thing to do.”

I couldn’t agree more. Especially since there’s a prominently featured golden retriever, and I am nothing if not a golden-lover. Any political action endorsed by a sweet, fluffy golden is something I can get behind. (Ok, that’s probably not technically true. But, fluffy!)

Everything about the march sounds amazing–like a cross between an Occupy encampment and an art festival. From the official event description:

This event is family-friendly and fun for all ages! While we have a serious purpose, the march will also include musical performances, art, community potlucks, discussions, faith and spiritual experiences, and lots of opportunities to get to know your fellow marchers and movement members as we walk the transition we want to see. Along the way we will rally, sing, learn, make new plans, and meet new friends.

I so, so wish I could be there.

And I can’t help but think of one of my favorite critiques of the climate movement, Melanie Jae Martin’s “Three Tactics for a Stronger Climate Movement,” and be grateful that the organizers of the Energy Exodus have apparently taken her words to heart:

Imagine if, when blockading a pipeline construction site, radicals invited the whole community to a festival on the site? Instead of a few people locking down, what if the community barricaded the area and held a dance party or a carnival, reclaiming it as a community space for direct democracy, food growing, and celebration? When resilience becomes a key characteristic of the space, joining together to defend it will become less scary and more joyful. People could use the space to construct their own cooperative forms of alternative energy, like community-owned wind power systems. As the movement nourishes the souls of participants more fully, its passion, energy, and numbers will grow, just as the round dance protests of the indigenous rights movement Idle No More have caught on like wildfire throughout the continent and beyond. And in the process, we’ll be forging the alternatives that are absolutely crucial for subverting corporate attacks on the land, air, and water.

Continue reading

Blog announcement #2

So….after reading Issa’s post about NaBloWriMo (i.e., writing one blog post per day for the month of November), I’ve decided to switch to that from NaPoWriMo.

Which means, lucky readers, that you’ll get more posting instead of less!

I have somewhat conflicted feelings about this. On one hand, blogging is where my heart is right now. It’s what inspires me. It’s where my creative energy wants to go.

On the other hand, it feels like a cop-out. I love poetry, and have a hard time getting myself to write it. So the idea of devoting myself to it for a month sounded like a wonderful opportunity and challenge: a way to get away from screens, slow down, turn inward.

The problem is, I don’t want to turn inward right now. I want to turn outward, to connect.

Continue reading

Blog announcement: posting will be light in November

In my neighborhood, we don’t just have pumpkins. We have three-eyed hipster pumpkins.

Next month, I’m going to be attempting NaNoWriMo–except that since I write poetry rather than fiction, I’m actually going to be doing something more like NaPoWriMo.

NaPoWriMo takes place in April, but I’m joining in with the November novel-writers in order to get some social support and structure. I haven’t been writing as much as I would like lately, so I’m hoping that going to meetups regularly will help me kick my own ass into gear.

Therefore, posting will be pretty light. I’ve scheduled some posts in advance, and I’ll try to schedule a few more before the end of October, but there will still be fewer posts than usual (and fewer, if any, Friday links).

Happy writing to my fellow WriMos, and I’ll see you all in December–just in time for all the glitz and glamour of the holiday season. 🙂

Friday links 9/28/12

My desk

The internet is full of interesting this week. So I present you ALL THE LINKS.

-There’s a new issue of Volup2 magazine out! It’s full of beauty–all kinds of beauty, not the narrow version represented in mainstream media. Also, you can support Volup2 on Kickstarter to help make the next issue possible.
-Through Volup2, I found the pure fascinator porn that is Pearls and Swine.
-Wonderful geekery in video form: Hank Green’s song about Tetris.
-Speaking of the Vlogbrothers, a German TV station did a touching interview with John about The Fault in Our Stars. (Which, btw, you should read if you haven’t already.)
-Ragen writes about the bullshit that is conflating “obesity” with eating disorders.
When more curvy people practice yoga…
It’s hard enough to be a fat kid without the government telling you you’re an epidemic. Those ads…wow. Just wow. (Also, don’t read the comments. XOJane comments can be really good sometimes, but these ones….are not.)
Continue reading

On life and dreams: a ramble

I aspire to be glamorous like Kat Williams and La Carmina: to wear vintage dresses and get paid to travel the world. To make magazines. To go on adventures with kindred fa(t)shion spirits in party dresses, petticoats, and pink hair.

I aspire to inspire other fat girls and women like Tess Munster. To create badass images of fat beauty. To show them they, too, can be beautiful.

I aspire to walk in the woods, full of wonder, like Mary Oliver. To live by the ocean, to wander the tidal flats, to dive deep into the blue mystery that is life.

I aspire to tell my truths, like Cheryl Strayed. To crack hearts open in the best way. To write with both brutality and kindness.

I am still struggling to integrate these visions, these dreams, the many different ways I see myself. Continue reading