Friday links, 1/4/13

Delicious pomegranate chocolate cupcakes that a friend made

Fat Activism
In news we already knew, “overweight” people have a lower risk of mortality than “normal weight” ones. Paul Campos and Marilyn Wann both have great responses.
-Ragen reviews her successes of 2012, and reveals a new project.
-Tori’s new year resolution: to like food.
-Hanne Blank interviews Virgie Tovar, author of Hot & Heavy.
-Haley of Redefining Body Image reflects on how her great-grandmother taught her to be fat and fabulous.

Fa(t)shion
-Chubstr interviews Reah Norman, the Executive Fashion Director for PLUS Model Magazine.
-Buttercup has a great post about saying no to fashion rules–and check out her badass squirrel sweater!
Dani and Ms. Red Kitty are both undertaking no-buying wardrobe challenges. I really like the point that one of the commenters on the latter post made:

I really think I have a “thing” about clothes just because of how… unavailable clothing that I liked used to be. Up until the last couple of years it was very hard to find things, so I sort of have a “buy now or you’ll never have it” attitude. Really have to be careful, step back, and think about whether I need that item or will I ever wear it.

This is so true. And even though more clothing is now available in plus sizes, it’s still more expensive than straight-sized clothing–and it’s hard to find anything at thrift stores–so it’s easy to end up spending too much money.

Everything Else
Guidelines for enjoying other cultures without appropriating them.
-A beautiful story about an amazing woman: What my mother taught me about feminism and fear.
On behalf of Willow Smith and girls like her, shut up.
-It may be a bit late for linking to holiday gift guides, but I like this list of media made by queer people of color.
-I like Aoife’s take on the “friend zone.”
Continue reading

Global pandemics? Usually a bad idea.

One of my favorite vloggers, Hank Green, recently made a video about, among other things, a tick whose bite causes a severe allergy to red meat. I’d read about it before, and it’s fucking terrifying–the reaction doesn’t happen immediately, so people go into anaphylactic shock out of the blue, and it can take some time to figure out the cause.

Hank, a devoted environmentalist, proposes a question: if you could cause a global pandemic of this allergy, thereby ensuring that no one could eat red meat, would you?

NO NO NO, Hank. Just no.

I know that Hank doesn’t actually want to release these ticks upon the world. I know he’s just trying to get a discussion started about meat and the environment.

But it’s still so, so, so not ok. For many reasons.

1.)  Anaphylactic shock is not a laughing matter. It’s pretty callous to joke about subjecting the entire world to the possibility of it. Actually, it’s pretty callous to joke about infecting the world with any kind of disease, even one that would be supposedly good for the environment.

2.) If you were to infect the entire world with the disease, how would you warn everyone in time? How would you account for the likelihood that some people wouldn’t get the news before eating a hamburger, or that some might eat contaminated food and get sick? How would you account for the very good chance that you would be directly responsible for killing people? Continue reading