Happy Thanksgiving/Support black-owned businesses for Black Friday

As if we needed another reminder that our country was built by violence against people of color, today is Thanksgiving, which effectively celebrates the genocide of Native Americans. So I wish you all a happy Thanksgiving–because spending quality time with family and friends is important, and because pumpkin pie is delicious–but also a reflective one, one that honors the holiday’s history.

If you were planning to shop at major retailers this weekend, consider supporting black-owned businesses instead, as many black organizations have asked. If you’re looking to donate money instead of, or in addition to, shopping, check out this list of black-led organizations on the ground in Ferguson, and the Ferguson Public Library’s Powell’s wishlist (see this post for the library’s address and purchasing instructions).

Now for the fun part: pretty things you can buy from black-owned businesses, including Boston’s own The Thicky Chicky!

collage of items by black owned businesses

Top row:
Graffiti dress, Zelie For She, $85
Ka’oir lipsticks, $16.99 each
Chub rub shorts, The Thicky Chicky, $6

Middle row (all books I’ve read and loved):
Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay, $10.95
Redefining Realness by Janet Mock, $15.95
Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler, $10.50
Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, $10.95

Bottom row:
Kiss Me fascinator in rose gold metallic, Hello Sweet Leigh, $55
Purple mambo skirt, Nakimuli, $130 (use the discount code THANKFUL14 for 20% off)
Fleur dress, The Thicky Chicky, $30.20
Triumph sequin dress, $125, and Sparkle skirt, $79, Zelie for She

The Big Thrifty 2014 = awesomeness.

group of volunteers sitting on pile of bagged clothing donations

The Big Thrifty just gets better every year. This year, it moved to a much more spacious location, which was a huge improvement over the previous one. Not only was it bigger, air-conditioned, and so much more comfortable, but it had extra space for movement classes and hanging out. Being able to sit around, talk with my friends, and make new ones made the event so much more fun.

I volunteered to help set up the event the night before, which was a lot of fun although unexpectedly exhausting. I got to meet Deb Malkin, the founder of Re/Dress and co-founder of the Big Fat Flea, and a bunch of other cool people. We volunteers also got first crack at the clothes, and I found a few great pieces–including the sparkly bubble skirt that I wore to the event itself.

One of the new features this year was a photobooth, which means I have some fun pictures from the event to post! A bunch of them feature the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, a modern order of queer nuns. They were so nice and had some truly fabulous costumes.

three women and two drag nuns in rainbow photobooth

Me with Shannon, Emily, and two of the Sisters

Continue reading

The Thicky Chicky Launch party

Last week, after a year and a half of blogging, I finally attended my first honest-to-goodness glamorous fatshion event: the launch of a new online plus size boutique, The Thicky Chicky.

me wearing leopard coat and hot pink dress

On the way to the launch, and at it!

outfit details: dress: Domino Dollhouse, leggings and heart necklace: Wet Seal, shoes: Naot, sequined cardigan: Kohl’s (a long time ago), tiara: Kmart, giant bow: The Velvet Village, leopard coat: thrifted (for $12, by my mom, who has thrifting superpowers), Hello Kitty bag: present from a friend (I think she got it free with a purchase at Sephora), scarf: made by my mom, gloves: Best Deals U Can Find on Amazon, custom Tutus and Tiny Hats necklace: DiDepux, bangles: Torrid and Deb, bow ring, earrings, and rhinestone bracelet: So Good, flower necklace: eBay

Isabel Lopes, the founder of The Thicky Chicky, emphasized the importance of building women’s confidence in a world that tried to tell us our bodies are wrong. I love that she has such a strong commitment to body positivity, and I love how she illustrated it with the following anecdote about a magazine article she read. It advised women to suck in their stomachs, have good posture, and hold their heads high in order to appear slimmer. She agreed with the advice, but for different reasons: she felt that we should suck in our stomachs in order to support our voices, have good posture to demonstrate confidence, and hold our heads high to show that we bow to no one.

Melissa, me, Isabel, and Jesse

The event included a fashion show of some of TTC’s designs, including this gold sequin dress designed by Izzy herself. It’s in production now and should be available next month:

Continue reading