Thoughts on fatshion and revolution

In Tasha Fierce’s latest post, she brings up some important points about the goals of fat acceptance:

Now, I love clothes. I mean, I LOVE clothes. But I’m also personally invested in intersectionality and the idea that all liberation movements are entwined. So when I see us desiring to buy into the mindless capitalism and consumption of clothing that’s marketed to thin folks, I get frustrated. Insisting that fat folks’ money is just as good as thin folks’ money, so therefore we should have equal access to the same sweatshop-produced clothing lines offered by multinational corporations who use their profits to subjugate marginalized folks around the world? I don’t want that kind of revolution.

I don’t want that kind of revolution either.

I think we’re at a weird moment in plus size fashion where some people–especially those who wear smaller plus sizes and have a decent amount of disposable income–have enough options that it’s easy to acquire huge piles of clothing. But at the same time, low-income and/or larger fats still struggle to find clothes, and some people still have nearly no options at all. Even smaller fats who have specialized needs, unusual taste, or a gender presentation that doesn’t match most of what’s available can find themselves with very little to wear.

Which means that there’s an awfully fuzzy line between demanding clothes that people genuinely need in order to live their lives, and asking for assimilation into the destructive system of disposable fast fashion. I know I’ve fallen on the wrong side of that line myself plenty of times, even though I’ve also done a lot of thinking about what sustainable fashion could look like and how fat people are building community-oriented alternatives like clothing swaps and thrifting events. I’ve always found it hard to reconcile my love of ALL THE SHINY THINGS with my anti-capitalist values, and this is something I need to work on. Continue reading