Monday Links, 11/11/13

Apologies again for the lateness of this week’s links! I’m thinking about moving the feature to Sundays in the future.

This weekend Steve and I took a somewhat impromptu trip to Western Mass to hike with my parents and then visit a friend (and meet her new kitty), and it was lovely. 🙂 I hope you all had a good weekend, and are enjoying today’s holiday if you have it off.

Fa(t)shion
-The latest issue of Skorch is out! It features an amazing shoot of a drag queen wearing mostly Domino Dollhouse clothes.
-SimplyBe’s golden renaissance photoshoot, featuring a gaggle of fatshion bloggers, is gorgeous. There’s nothing like metallics and sparkle for the holidays.
-A Mighty Femme writes about her experiences with cutting her hair as a queer, Asian femme, and about the pressure to be fabulous within the fat acceptance movement as a way to counteract stereotypes.
-I’ve been reading a bunch of posts about Plus London 2013, a plus size fashion and community weekend. Unfortunately, many more people showed up for the Brand Day than for the Community Day, which says something troubling about the influence of corporations on fatshion communities.
Africa’s first fair-trade garment manufacturer is a model for women’s empowerment.
-Heather Ann discovered Blue Fish, a company that makes organic, ethically-produced plus size clothes. Their items are definitely expensive, and not everyone’s style, but I’m glad they exist.
-Igigi’s blog interviews Elizabeth of Culture Shocked on being an American expat fatshionista in China.
-Through this amazing post on Advanced Style–I aspire to be half that fabulous when I’m an old lady!–I found Lauren Shanley’s site, which is pure eye candy. (Note: some of her works are potentially culturally appropriative.)
-Isabel rounds up ten TARDIS-themed wearables in honor of Doctor Who’s upcoming 50th anniversary special.
-These tomboy flower girl outfits are adorable.
-Appalatch, a company that produces clothing ethically in the US, has come up with an idea for a sweater that is custom-made to the customer’s measurements, reducing fabric waste. Of course, their clothes don’t come in plus sizes–and to be honest, they’re pretty boring–but it’s a good idea, and I hope to see it catch on.

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