Sunday Links, 4/19/15

A few tasty things I've eaten lately: tofu bibimbop.

A few tasty things I’ve eaten recently. This one is tofu bibimbop.

Fa(t)shion
Quote of the day: Janelle Monae is not for male consumption.
-Celeb kids wearing awesome gender-bending outfits: Jaden Smith in a dress, and Mark Ruffalo and his daughter Bella in matching suits.
I went in search of non-boring plus size activewear and this is what I found.
The folk feminist struggle behind the chola fashion trend.
Lane Bryant #ImNoAngel campaign misses the (stretch) mark.
13 plus size neoprene fashions to rock this spring.
-My friend Femma has started Femme FatSew, a blog about sewing plus size clothes.
-Pepper recounts a challenge in which plus size bloggers wear outfits that match different fun, springy shades of nail polish.
-I so want to try to make this DIY flower-filled tulle skirt.

Fat Acceptance
Pregnancy, obesity, and the lies we tell.
Obesity, dementia, and some seriously shady reporting.
Help Rachel attend yoga teacher training so she can bring more body-positive yoga to the Boston area!
How to help a fat-shamed kid.
Ugliness is not a fat person’s worth fear, it’s being invisible.

Pizza with broccoli, lemon, goat cheese, garlic, mushrooms, and basil

Pizza with broccoli, lemon, goat cheese, garlic, mushrooms, and basil

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Sunday links, 12/7/14

Thursday night's protest on the Boston Common.

Thursday night’s protest on the Boston Common.

Eric Garner/Mike Brown/#BlackLivesMatter
(I know this is an overwhelming amount of links, but 1.) this shit is important and 2.) there’s been so much necessary and powerful writing, I couldn’t pick just a few pieces.)
Can you breathe? Reflections on non-indictment, activism, and black life.
White America’s scary delusion: why its sense of black humanity is so skewed.
-This is painfully true, and be forewarned that the painting at the end of the post might make you cry: The 10 stages of what happens when there’s injustice against black people.
-Katherine Cross writes about why she was not surprised by the Eric Garner decision, as a trans woman of color who has seen her sisters regularly face brutality from the NYPD.
Meet the BART-stopping woman behind “Black Lives Matter.”
This country needs a truth and reconciliation process on violence against African Americans–right now.
-Another incredibly fucked-up decision: charges were dropped against the police officer who shot 7-year old Aiyana Stanley-Jones while she slept in her own home.
-In a rare example of someone (although not a cop) being held accountable for killing a black person, Renisha McBride’s killer was found guilty of murder.
-“Twelve years after getting my Vassar College faculty ID, I sit here and know that the nation can’t structurally and emotionally assault black kids and think they’re going to turn out OK.”
This stops today: seeking strategies to end discriminatory policing. A key point: “support [solutions] that take power and money away from the cops, and those that give power to the people.”
Police “reforms” you should always oppose. Likewise: Body cameras won’t stop police brutality, and Eric Garner is only one of several reasons why.
-An important analysis of public space and power: After Ferguson, we have to ask: who owns the streets?

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Clothing for “all women” is not actually for all women (surprise!)

Ragen recently posted about Fabletics, an athletic wear company started by Kate Hudson. Although it claims to be for “women of all shapes and sizes,” shockingly enough, it’s not–it’s only for women who wear between a size 0-2/XS and 18-20/XXL. Their sizing is generous enough that I could probably fit into their bottoms, and possibly their tops if they’re sufficiently stretchy, which is more than I can say for a lot of brands that end at 18-20/XXL. But it’s still nowhere near inclusive of “all women.”

This is the letter I submitted to their contact page. If you’re also bothered by their messaging, consider sending them a note as well.

Dear Fabletics,

I am writing with regard to your messaging that your clothing is for “every body type,” “women of all shapes and sizes,” and “all women.” Contrary to these messages, I noticed that Fabletic’s clothes end at size XXL/18-20.

I appreciate that this is a broader range of sizing than most athletic brands. However, it still comes nowhere near including all women. As a woman who usually wears a size 20 or 22, I could probably fit into the bottoms, but not the tops; and I know many women larger than myself who would love to buy affordable, fashionable athletic wear if it was available in their size.

I am not asking you to expand your size range, although that would be great–I am merely asking that you be honest in your messaging. A size range from 0-2 to 18-20 includes many women, perhaps even a majority of women, but it definitely does not include “all women.”

If you do decide that you genuinely want to make clothes for all women, I recommend following the example of eShakti, a manufacturer that sells clothing in sizes 0 through 36 and also offers custom sizing.

Thank you for your time and consideration.

Sincerely,
Laura