Sunday Links, 10/12/14

carousel in front of tree with orange autumn foliage

Fa(t)shion
-Nicolette Mason’s ModCloth collection is finally here! Check out her and Gabi‘s blogs for some fabulous pictures of a real-life girl gang modeling the clothes, as well as a discount code.
-Bethany reflects on fat femme power.
-Kobi Jae of Horror Kitsch Bitch has started an Alternative Curves Blog Hop. I didn’t have the time/energy to put together a themed outfit this month, but I’m hoping to participate next month!
How Madewell bought and sold my family’s history.
-Tanesha of Girl With Curves has released a full range of clothes for fall.
Eight cute plaid dresses in fat sizes, now with 50% more ’90s references.
-Affatshionista reviews Gwynnie Bee.
Style advice for a 50-something trans woman just beginning her transition.
-I wish I could have been at Re/Dress’ meet and greet event with Tess Munster!
Change your style, change your life.
-Want to see what a Glitterati box looks like? Check out these three posts.
Manish Arora’s new fall/winter collection is amazing–this is exactly the kind of imaginative fashion I want to see in size fat.
-Ugh: one-size-only clothing store is the last thing teen girls need.
Gabi’s trip to London Fashion Week with a group of other fatshion bloggers looks so fun.
Spotted! Blogstar Chastity Garner in Vogue Italia.
Fashion and feminism: a chat with Ana Marcela Villa of AKV.

Fat Acceptance
6 must-read perspectives that destroy the War on Obesity.
-If you’re in Sacramento, San Francisco, or Chicago, check out Virgie Tovar’s upcoming events.
Stop policing my daughter’s appetite.
-I actually like Subway’s sandwiches, so I’m always disappointed to hear about them using fat-phobic advertising.
Women’s value is not based on whether men find us attractive.
“Homeland” dares to show fat sex, and it’s only “weird” or “disturbing” if you’ve always assumed fat women are sexless freaks.

This musical protest, in which demonstrators disrupted the St. Louis symphony to sing a “Requiem for Mike Brown,” gives me chills:
Continue reading

Sunday links, 9/21/14: it’s finally fall

pumpkins and squash at farm stand

Fa(t)shion
-The New Yorker has a great profile of plus size style–just ignore the obligatory crap about how “obesity is a genuine health issue.”
A first for high fatshion: the Design Collective at Evans LFW Catwalk Show.
Two up-and-coming labels sent plus size models down the catwalk at NYFW.
-Kath shares an experience of clothes-shopping as it should be.
-Affinity rounds up places that sell plus size Halloween costumes in a variety of sizes, some up to 12X.
Why do designers hide their plus size lines? (Spoiler alert: because they’re douchenozzles who let fat-phobia get in the way of profit.)
How to manage a massive closet purge.
Are you more likely to buy things from retailers who use models in lots of different sizes?
-Everything in Zelie for She’s Pink Carousel collection is amazing, and should teleport to my closet immediately.
Rock n’ Roll Bride’s new collection for Crown & Glory = awesome.
-The San Diego fat clothing swap looks like it was so much fun!
22 fashion infographics you need in your life.
While the fashion world swoons over this season’s styles, the workers making them are fainting on the job.
The fast fashion industry doesn’t want you to know about these things.

Fat Acceptance
Vogue didn’t discover big booty–booty never left.
Fat discrimination is real discrimination.
Things you only know if you’re a “fat girl” on the internet.
Why I’m not signing the OAC petition.
Fat para-academics, read this!
-If you’re in Oakland, check out this fat dance performance.

Climate and Sustainability
Environmental justice works, and these folks show us how.
-Rebecca Solnit provides thoughtful historical context for the People’s Climate March. (Sadly, I won’t be able to make it, as life has been exhausting lately and I am dead-tired. But I will be there in spirit!)
Why do we protest? “We shouldn’t stop trying to create the world that we want to live in, but at the same time, we need to live right now in the world we want to create. We certainly can’t buy our way there and we probably can’t fight our way there either. Better to make as many friends as we can, gather them close, watch the flames together, and try to figure out how to live in the light that the fire reflects.”
Watch out, Wall Street, climate marchers are coming for you next.
Naomi Klein is right: unchecked capitalism will destroy civilization. I agree with this 110% except for the predictable analogy comparing climate change to weight gain causing diabetes, sigh.
11 short stories about the People’s Climate Train.
Civil rights heroes offer climate marchers a little wisdom.
Hey, U.N.: climate change and population are related. Continue reading

Reminder: the People’s Climate March is coming up next month

I know I haven’t been blogging about climate change much lately because my mind has been on other things (and because I only have the energy to think, act, and write about so many issues at once). But I haven’t forgotten.

The People’s Climate March, which will take place in New York on September 21st, will be the single largest climate event to date.

This is going to be huge, and it’s important.

As Bill McKibben says in his call to action:

You can watch the endgame of the fossil-fuel era with a certain amount of hope. The pieces are in place for real, swift, sudden change, not just slow and grinding linear shifts: If Germany on a sunny day can generate half its power from solar panels, and Texas makes a third of its electricity from wind, then you know technology isn’t an impossible obstacle anymore. The pieces are in place, but the pieces won’t move themselves. That’s where movements come in. They’re not subtle; they can’t manage all the details of this transition. But they can build up pressure on the system, enough, with luck, to blow out those bags of money that are blocking progress with the force of Typhoon Haiyan on a Filipino hut. Because if our resistance fails, there will be ever-stronger typhoons. The moment to salvage something of the Holocene is passing fast. But it hasn’t passed yet, which is why September is so important.

I’m going to be there, and I hope you’ll join me.

You can check out the event’s transportation page to see if there are buses going from your area to the march. Many local 350.org chapters are also holding art builds before the event–there will be six here in Massachusetts alone–so even if you can’t attend the march itself, there are still ways to get involved.