Further reading on the Zimmerman verdict

There has been so much good, thoughtful writing about the verdict and the social systems that allowed it to happen. Here are a few of the best pieces I’ve come across:

The Zimmerman jury told young black men what we already knew.
It is a complicated thing to be young, black, and male in America. Not only are you well aware that many people are afraid of you—you can see them clutching their purses or stiffening in their subway seats when you sit across from them—you must also remain conscious of the fact that people expect you to be apologetic for their fear. It’s your job to be remorseful about the fact that your very nature makes them uncomfortable, like a pilot having to apologize to a fearful flyer for being in the sky.

White supremacy acquits George Zimmerman.
When Zimmerman was acquitted today, it wasn’t because he’s a so-called white Hispanic. He’s not. It’s because he abides by the logic of white supremacy, and was supported by a defense team—and a swath of society—that supports the lingering idea that some black men must occasionally be killed with impunity in order to keep society-at-large safe.

We are not Trayvon Martin: a Tumblr exploring race and privilege through people’s personal experiences. The creator of the blog explains here why he started it:
So much of the coverage and trial has been about race, Trayvon’s race, and what that meant for him. But all to often those of us who get the benefits of racism can’t see. We can’t see it because the world just appears normal. Living a “normal” life means i don’t have to think about race.
But race shapes my world as much as it shapes Trayvon’s, and it is my responsibility to see that and change that. 

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Quote of the Day

“I asked [Naomi Klein] about her decision to have a baby, in spite of everything she knows.

She got quiet. ‘For a long time,’ she told me, ‘I just couldn’t see a future for a child that wasn’t some, like, Mad Max climate-warrior thing.’

Somehow, though, her engagement in the climate movement seems to have changed that. Another future seemed possible. She and Lewis decided to have a child, but struggled with infertility. Then, having given up, surprise: along came Toma.

If anything, the experience has made Klein all the more a fighter. She now believes that denying her desire to have a child, because of the mess being made by those willing to destroy the planet for profit, would be a form of surrender.

‘I guess what I want to say is, I don’t want to give them that power,’ she told me. “I’d rather fight like hell than give these evil motherfuckers the power to extinguish the desire to create life.'”

‘I’d rather fight like hell’: Naomi Klein’s fierce new resolve to fight for climate justice