Friday links, 4/12/13

A sign of spring 🙂

Fa(t)shion
-The Aussie Curves Sydney meetup sounds like so much fun! I wish we had something like it in Boston.
-Melbournians (Melbournites? Melbournistas?), check out the Hey Fatty & Friends Market.
-I love Shannon’s reflections on clothing and identity.
This thread has some good suggestions for finding plus size steampunk clothing.
-I have no particular interest in horse races, but the hats that women wear to them are fantastic.
-More amazing hats: the Milliner’s Guild at the National Arts Club.
-Pure kawaii eye candy: 6%DOKIDOKI Mook exclusive photo shoot.
The outfits and costumes at the New York Easter parade are amazing! Most of the time I’m glad that I don’t live in NYC, but these pictures make me wish I did.

Fat Acceptance
Girl talk: confessions of a thin-privileged fat activist.
A letter to the doctor who told me I’d be dead right now because of my fat.
-On a sadly similar note: My doctors are killing me.
-It always makes me happy when I see a fat dancer on my Tumblr dashboard.
Fat people deserve to eat. So much yes!

Climate Justice and Sustainability
-Bill McKibben has a new piece in Rolling Stone! It’s about the fossil fuel resistance movement, and like everything else he writes, it’s brilliant.
The Oklahoma grandmother who chained herself to Keystone XL heavy machinery is a total badass.
-I love stories like this: Community thrives along a nearly forgotten slice of an urban river.
Keystone XL pipeline risks harm to Houston community: “This is obviously environmental racism.”
-A really interesting conversation between James Hansen and Bill McKibben.

Continue reading

Truly sustainable fashion: what would it look like, and how do we get there?

I’ve been thinking a lot about the need for durable, small-scale, community-based economies–because that’s the only way we’re going to survive in this age of climate change. And I’ve been wondering, what does that mean for fashion? What would a sustainable system of clothing production look like?

Clothing swaps and bargain shopping events are a major step in the right direction. But new clothing still has to come from somewhere.

I really like The Social Skin’s vision of a sustainable textile industry. In it, fibers are grown locally whenever possible, including from animals like sheep and rabbits; local fabric shops create various types of cloth while paying their workers a living wage; people sew simple items at home, and take fabric to tailors for more complicated garments; and people care for their clothing carefully, using it until it wears out or selling it at consignment stores. Also, hats come back in style, providing work for local milliners–an idea which I can get behind 100%!

A sustainable system involving hats? Sign me up!

The way clothing would get made sounds wonderful:

You collaborate with the dressmaker on your garment design and in choosing your trimming and notions. She contributes expertise in fabric drapery and cut, suggestions on styles she has seen work before, and information on current fashion trends or historic styles as appropriate. You contribute your preferences on the style, cut, colors and fabrics that work for you. You might bring in pictures of clothes you’ve seen to be copied, with whatever adjustments you want, or your favorite old dress to be recreated in fresh fabric. All of your clothes fit you perfectly, are exactly the right length, height, and width in every place. The colors are always flattering to your complexion, the cuts always flattering to your figure, the style always exactly what you feel most comfortable and lovely wearing. What a dream!

There would be so much more room for creativity, and people of all sizes could get clothing they love, rather than being left out by corporations that don’t want their clothing seen on fat people.

Continue reading