Friday Links, 11/23/12

FA
-The Fat Nutritionist has a lovely post of advice on dealing with the holidays.
It’s not because I’m fat.
This New Moon article about food and eating is amazing. I hope it reaches many, many girls.
The end of fat people: goodbye, Hostess.
-Lesley writes movingly about her preteen eating disordered years.
-A lovely piece–complete with adorable baby pictures!– by a mother who found that she could no longer hate her chin once she saw the same feature on her daughter.

Fa(t)shion
A new study shows that, despite the growing number of fatshion bloggers, mainstream companies have not responded by making more plus-size clothes. Although that’s disappointing, I agree with Nicolette Mason’s quote in the article. She says that the independent plus-size marketplace is thriving, and gives many examples of indie plus-size lines. Also, how cool is it that there’s a study called “Frustrated Fatshionistas: An Institutional Theory Perspective on Consumer Quests for Greater Choice in Mainstream Markets?”
-Threadless’ TARDamask shirt is back in stock! They only have a few sizes available (and unfortunately no Men’s 2XL, which should fit me according to the size chart), but if you wear one of those sizes, check it out.
These costumes are amazing.
-Who knew that Land’s End made some nice plus size clothing, including this lovely sequined skirt?
The real cost of your clothing.
Smart internet shopping for style lovers.
-This plus size Australian clothing swap sounds like so much fun!

Other
Tuesday was Transgender Day of Remembrance, which should be a day of action for cisgender people.
-Robert Reich, the former Secretary of Labor under Clinton, is working on a film about inequality in the US. He’s amazing–I took a class with him in college, and he’s probably the best lecturer I’ve ever heard. He can make any concept understandable and fascinating, and he’s got a great sense of humor. The inequality in our society right now is a huge, huge issue, and I’m glad he’s trying to bring it to light. I highly recommend donating to his Kickstarter, or at least passing on the word.
-A must-read from Dahlia Lithwick: I didn’t come back to Jerusalem to be in a war.
Cliff mocks the latest issue of Cosmo, which is as ridiculous as usual.
-A beautiful story by an adopted transwoman whose Korean birth mother gave her the courage to transition.
-A great comic from The Oatmeal about creating things for a living.

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The complex ethics of fa(t)shion blogging

Fatshion: the intersection of revolution and glitter.

Through another one of Sal’s link round-ups, I found this thoughtful post on the ethics of fashion blogging.

RK makes really good points, but I have some thoughts that complicate the matter–especially when it comes to fatshion.

1.) Fatshion is radical. It’s about taking up space, showing the world that fat women (and men) can have fun with fashion too. That we don’t have to wear muumuus, unless we want to. That we won’t put up with shitty clothing options from major retailers like Lane Bryant. That we don’t believe the right to self-expression should end at a size 14.

Fatshion is about inspiring people never thought they could dress themselves in a fun and creative way. It’s about inspiring people who used to think they were only allowed to wear black, or vertical stripes, or small prints. It’s a way of building community, both in the blog-o-sphere and in physical spaces like plus size boutiques, pop up stores, and clothing swaps.

Fatshion, for many people, contributes to the process of loving their bodies–although there are many other ways to do so, and neither fatshion nor loving your body should be mandatory.

2.) Enjoying compliments on your style is not an inherently bad thing, especially if you’re also complimenting others. Sure, it can get out of hand if it becomes your sole motivation, and then it’s a good idea to step back a bit.

But for fat people, compliments aren’t just good selfish fun. They’re an antidote to the ridiculous amount of negative messages we receive every day.

I’m lucky in that I’ve never gotten fat-related insults from strangers. I’ve never been mooed at, or called a fat ugly bitch from a moving car, or judged on my shopping cart contents. But these are all things that have happened to other women in the fat-o-sphere. And despite my luck at dodging such explicit insults–and in fact getting regular compliments from strangers on everything from my glitter bows to my dark purple skinny corduroys–I still have to deal with something like 386,170 fat-negative messages a year from the media.
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