Outfit August, day 31: floral extravaganza

Sometimes people wonder why I wear ginormous flowers on my head all the time. The day trip I took to Shelburne Falls yesterday confirmed the two main reasons: it makes me feel more like myself, and it gets positive reactions from people everywhere I go.

plus size outfit black top and pink and purple flower crown

Top and skirt: thrifted, flower crown: Boohoo, necklace: vintage key on a chain, earrings: from a little shop in Shelburne Falls

I figured I’d wear my biggest flower crown to visit the Bridge of Flowers–because when in Rome, dress like the scenery, right? I got so many compliments from strangers, and even had two different people ask if they could take my picture. I love when random people want to photograph me–it makes me feel so famous. 🙂 And in general, I love fa(t)shion as a conversation starter: a way to have small positive interactions with friends, acquaintances, and strangers alike.

me and steve smelling pink hibiscus flowers on the bridge of flowers in shelburne falls

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Sunday links, 5/25/14

Y-shaped tree with people making M, C, and A shapes

We found an interesting tree while hiking last weekend…

Fa(t)shion
-I love this fatshionista paper doll.
-If you’re looking to both buy some awesome mermaid-themed jewelry and support a transgender person with Asperger’s who has trouble sustaining traditional employment, check out Earl Foolish.
The fashion victims of Bangladesh.
Wandering the no (wo)man’s land between straight and plus sizes.
Work it! The new face of labor in fashion.
Quvenzhane Wallis is the adorable new face of Armani Junior.
From Lorde to Rihanna to the new Barbie, Goth culture’s comeback is a win for women.
Sheri and Sarah both round up plus size crop tops.
Do this don’t: dress like a fat marshmallow.
-A fascinating conversation on design and systems, both in fashion and in a broader sense.

Fat Acceptance
-Roxy takes apart the ridiculous concept of “glorifying obesity.”
Great postcards for the Abundant Bodies track at the AMC.
-This fat coloring book project looks really cool.
Fat-phobic trolls don’t just want to be rude–they want power over us.
-Check out Hanne Blank’s new body acceptance project, 52 Weeks to Your Best Body Ever.
Discrimination, doxxing, and that ‘Louie’ episode: a Q&A with the filmmakers behind ‘Fattitude.’

Climate and Sustainability
A call to arms for the climate march in New York this September. I will do my best to be there!
-Bill McKibben and a group of climate scientists and activists did an AMA on Reddit.
Solar farms can enhance biodiversity and sequester soil carbon too.
Geothermal: the red hot renewable that could incite a green power revolution.
A blueprint to end paralysis over global action on climate.
Before repairing the climate, we’ll have to repair the effects of racism.

An awesome mashup of two great songs:
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We need to talk about how social and economic structures impact health.

lake in the woods

Within the fat acceptance and HAES movements, there has been a growing realization that health is much more complicated than personal diet and exercise choices–that we can’t talk seriously about health without talking about the social and economic barriers that affect it on both the personal and public levels. I’m really glad that we’re talking about these structural forces, and I’d love to see more in-depth discussions, both within and outside of our communities.

I’ve been thinking about this a lot lately, especially after a wonderful hike I went on last weekend. I just feel so in my element when I’m in the woods, and I get a great workout without consciously trying. There’s something so peaceful, so natural about being surrounded by trees, coming across everything from tiny frogs to wildflowers and heart-shaped leaves. There’s magic in the woods, the kind that doesn’t go away when you grow up.

Coming home from a simultaneously exhilarating and relaxing hike, I couldn’t help but think, contrary to conventional wisdom, how little of my health is actually within my control. Yes, healthy habits are still our best shot at improving and maintaining health. Yes, there are certainly things I can do differently, and I’m working on them. But there are so many structural limits that impact my health, and I imagine how they could be different:

– If working about 20 hours/week were standard, I could work mornings and then hike most afternoons. Or, during the winter, snowshoe or cross-country ski. I live in the city and don’t have a car (and don’t want one)–but if there were high-speed, frequent, reliable trains from the city to the woods, I could easily get out into nature on a regular basis, or even live out there and commute into the city. This would make it a lot easier to engage in the types of exercise that feel easy and natural for me, and I have a feeling I’d feel better all-around if I were getting a higher dose of Vitamin Nature. Continue reading