Sunday links, 7/27/14

pink siam tulips flowers

Siam tulips in the conservatory at Longwood Gardens, Kennett Square, PA

Fa(t)shion
-A collection of pink plus size items on Etsy.
5 tips on how to deal with your wardrobe after a weight gain.
-I love this shop that sells plus size European clothes, which I found though In My Joi. I’m especially in love with this kaleidoscope print skater dress, this purple and black geometric tunic (it reminds of something the Idiosyncratic Fashionistas would wear), and this floral dress with an embroidered hem.
-Huzzah! Domino Dollhouse is now carrying Tripp, one of my favorite brands.
-Crown & Glory now has a monthly subscription service, the Glitterati.
Ashley Nell Tipton has some gorgeous new items, including an amazing iridescent lavender skirt and crop top.
Geeky plus size clothes? YES.

Fat Acceptance
-A powerful piece about fatness and eating disorders.
-There is going to be a Dances With Fat: The Movie!
On being fat, brown, femme, ugly, and unloveable.
My doctor didn’t fat-shame me, and it was a radical life-changing experience.
Can you do HAES and still want to lose weight?
Own the streets and the treats!
Shapely Prose tent revival: please do not literally torture yourself, ever.

Shapely Prose post of the week
Ask Aunt Fattie: Do I qualify for HAES?

two pink heart-shaped tropical flowers, one dark pink and one light pink

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#FatshionFebruary, day 23: workout wear

I love yoga–especially fast-paced, intense classes like the one I took today–because it makes me feel strong and grounded in my body.

Bodysuit: Re/Dress, shorts: Lane Bryant

I don’t always go this all-out-pink, but today it happened to be what was clean! And it worked out well, because it turned out that pink is my (incredibly awesome) yoga teacher’s favorite color. 🙂

My go-to yoga outfit is shorts from Lane Bryant or Target, and a tank top–usually from LB as well, although I like wearing this bodysuit sometimes because I don’t have to worry about stomach-exposure. I am also a big, big fan of the Enell sports bra.

Friday links 8/16/13

My favorite part of the farmers’ market. 🙂

Happy Friday! How have all of your weeks been going? I just started a new temp job as a Package Tetris Specialist (ahem, mail clerk), and it’s been good but exhausting. I am very, very glad that it’s almost the weekend.

Fa(t)shion
-I so wish I could be in Oakland for Virgie Tovar’s pop-up shop. That pink cloche! *swoons*
-Speaking of hats, this Advanced Style hat roundup is amazing. New life goal: become an old lady with the coolest hats.
-Even more haaaats! I am particularly in love with, well, the one that says “LOVE” in giant flower-covered letters.
-Chubby Cartwheels has a new line of hologram clothing!
-Marianne reviews the Enell sports bra (my favorite), bandalettes, and a tank top called the Breast Nest.
-She also writes about her feelings about dudes who creep on online fatshion pictures, which is pretty much how I feel as well.
Steal her style: Ali Koehler of Upset.

Fat Acceptance
-I love these chubby girl illustrations.
-Oxygen’s new show in which formerly fat people get revenge on fat shamers? Ugggh.
-Check out this fat cabaret show in L.A.–it will be streaming live for people who can’t make it in person.
-Point your med-student friends to the new HAES Curriculum, which is “a peer-reviewed curriculum designed for teaching health professionals and university students about the Health At Every Size® model.”
Hey, assholes: deporting fat people doesn’t actually make them go away.

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#IAmNotADisease roundup, part 3

There’s been so much good writing on the internet in response to the AMA’s decision to label “obesity” a disease.

1.) Lesley Kinzel, as usual, has a great analysis.

The point I like best actually comes from one of her comments:

The metabolic issues that the AMA is so eager to attribute to ALL obese people are not, in fact, exclusive to the fat. They happen to people of different sizes, and plenty of fat people never develop them. If we want to name a disease, maybe we should be researching how metabolic syndrome evolves and how it influences and is influenced by body size, rather than pointing at a group of people and based on their size, diagnose them all with issues they may well not even have?

2.) Marilyn Wann has a good piece that incorporates FA and HAES 101 at the Daily Kos. She is even brave enough to engage with the many commenters who just don’t get it, and I admire her so much for that. Not everyone has the Sanity Watchers points to do stuff like that–I certainly don’t!–and no one should have to, but it’s an important way of getting the message across to people who might never have heard it before. And even if they can’t wrap their minds around it now, there’s a good chance it will sink in eventually for some of them.

3.) Charlotte Cooper has a different viewpoint, which is also important.

Although the AMA news is terrible, I think it’s worth remembering that fat activists are moving away from the values that underpin obesity discourse, and have been doing so for a long time. A new cohort of politicised fat scholars are moving through the ranks and are threatening the parameters of traditional obesity research. Beyond the academy, our networks are gaining in strength, breadth and momentum. How long will it be until we have our own models for fat community health provision? Therapy practices like mine are only the beginning.

I understand the panic and upset about being labelled as a disease, it is utterly dehumanising. At the same time, the AMA is not the authority of me or my experience as a fat person. In many ways, I do feel like a treatment-resistant disease; one that is attacking the values that the AMA upholds like a virus in its system.

I’m really glad to see multiple types of activism springing up around the AMA’s decision. A diversity of activist tactics makes a strong movement, and increases our potential to reach people.

WLS: What a Load of Shit

I’ve been thinking about Fat Additives’ post about her experience with weight loss surgery (which I included in last week’s Friday Links).

I’ve read so many other horror stories about WLS. It’s scary that the weight-loss industry promotes it as a solution for so many fat people.

Sure, some people have good experiences. But the percentage of people who have serious problems is significant. And when a supposed cure makes things worse for a significant number of people? That’s a problem.

It’s a problem that even when it goes “right,” it can cause a lifetime of malnutrition and digestive problems.

It’s a problem that, in this day and age, we’re trying to cure health issues by mutilating healthy tissue rather than dealing with the issues directly.

Disclaimer: I’m not telling anyone what to do. People can make whatever choices they want about their own bodies, and if someone wants to get WLS, I won’t tell them not to (although I would encourage them to research it thoroughly).

BUT I have a problem with the widespread use of WLS. I wish it were reserved for the very rare cases in which it’s the lesser of two evils–and even then, I wish medical researchers were hard at work searching for alternatives.

Imagine if all the time, energy, and resources that go into WLS went into improving health regardless of weight. Into treating diabetes, heart disease, or mobility issues directly, rather than using weight as a terribly inaccurate proxy.

You may say I’m a dreamer, but I’m not the only one…

Site announcement: new comment policy

The comments on My Body is Not Heartbreaking got me thinking. Occasionally I’m up for engaging with well-meaning people who are unfamiliar with Fat Acceptance and Health At Every Size. But I don’t have the time, energy, or inclination to engage on a regular basis with people who believe fat = inherently unhealthy or bad.

And I want to make my comments a safe space for people of all sizes to hang out without hearing that their bodies are wrong.

So, effective now, I will not publish any comments that conflate weight and health, or otherwise pathologize fatness.

If you are genuinely curious about FA and HAES, please read these FA 101 Resources.

If you just want to talk about how terrible “obesity” is, please do that on your own blog.

Also not allowed are diet talk, racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, classism, ableism, and personal attacks.

Thank you!