Wednesday Fa(t)shion Inspirations, 6/18/14

Continue reading

Advertisements

Friday links 8/16/13

My favorite part of the farmers’ market. 🙂

Happy Friday! How have all of your weeks been going? I just started a new temp job as a Package Tetris Specialist (ahem, mail clerk), and it’s been good but exhausting. I am very, very glad that it’s almost the weekend.

Fa(t)shion
-I so wish I could be in Oakland for Virgie Tovar’s pop-up shop. That pink cloche! *swoons*
-Speaking of hats, this Advanced Style hat roundup is amazing. New life goal: become an old lady with the coolest hats.
-Even more haaaats! I am particularly in love with, well, the one that says “LOVE” in giant flower-covered letters.
-Chubby Cartwheels has a new line of hologram clothing!
-Marianne reviews the Enell sports bra (my favorite), bandalettes, and a tank top called the Breast Nest.
-She also writes about her feelings about dudes who creep on online fatshion pictures, which is pretty much how I feel as well.
Steal her style: Ali Koehler of Upset.

Fat Acceptance
-I love these chubby girl illustrations.
-Oxygen’s new show in which formerly fat people get revenge on fat shamers? Ugggh.
-Check out this fat cabaret show in L.A.–it will be streaming live for people who can’t make it in person.
-Point your med-student friends to the new HAES Curriculum, which is “a peer-reviewed curriculum designed for teaching health professionals and university students about the Health At Every Size® model.”
Hey, assholes: deporting fat people doesn’t actually make them go away.

Continue reading

Truly sustainable fashion: what would it look like, and how do we get there?

I’ve been thinking a lot about the need for durable, small-scale, community-based economies–because that’s the only way we’re going to survive in this age of climate change. And I’ve been wondering, what does that mean for fashion? What would a sustainable system of clothing production look like?

Clothing swaps and bargain shopping events are a major step in the right direction. But new clothing still has to come from somewhere.

I really like The Social Skin’s vision of a sustainable textile industry. In it, fibers are grown locally whenever possible, including from animals like sheep and rabbits; local fabric shops create various types of cloth while paying their workers a living wage; people sew simple items at home, and take fabric to tailors for more complicated garments; and people care for their clothing carefully, using it until it wears out or selling it at consignment stores. Also, hats come back in style, providing work for local milliners–an idea which I can get behind 100%!

A sustainable system involving hats? Sign me up!

The way clothing would get made sounds wonderful:

You collaborate with the dressmaker on your garment design and in choosing your trimming and notions. She contributes expertise in fabric drapery and cut, suggestions on styles she has seen work before, and information on current fashion trends or historic styles as appropriate. You contribute your preferences on the style, cut, colors and fabrics that work for you. You might bring in pictures of clothes you’ve seen to be copied, with whatever adjustments you want, or your favorite old dress to be recreated in fresh fabric. All of your clothes fit you perfectly, are exactly the right length, height, and width in every place. The colors are always flattering to your complexion, the cuts always flattering to your figure, the style always exactly what you feel most comfortable and lovely wearing. What a dream!

There would be so much more room for creativity, and people of all sizes could get clothing they love, rather than being left out by corporations that don’t want their clothing seen on fat people.

Continue reading