Friday links, 3/29/13

It’s spring, and the cupcakes are in bloom!

Fa(t)shion
The Style Crone and the Idiosyncratic Fashionistas always go to the best parties, full of people in fabulous outfits. I wish my life were that glamorous!
-There’s some amazing fa(t)shion in Offbeat Bride’s reader round-up. I’m especially in love with the rainbow tutu dress, of course.
-Japanese brand 6%DOKIDOKI’s new mook (magazine/book) sounds awesome.
-The Limited’s plus size line Eloquii is closing. I’ve never bought clothing from them, but it’s always disappointing to see a plus size option disappear.
Plus size clothing: Canada vs. the US.

Fat Acceptance
-Ragen answers the question, “what if I hate exercise?
I’m fat, and that’s fine.
-Over at Glorify, Tori writes about the constant, conflicting messages about which foods are “healthy.”
Weight talk, business travel edition.
-Reflections on the desire to be thin.
-Rachele of the Nearsighted Owl is drawing fat babes, and she’ll draw anyone who emails her!
This interview with Natalie of Definatalie is great (and damn, I love that flower crown she’s wearing in the first picture).

Climate/Sustainability
Do we all have to live like New Yorkers? Does density matter?  I think this is a really important piece, and I’m glad that we don’t have to turn the entire country into NYC in order to attain energy efficiency. (Where I live now is almost as dense as NYC, and I do love it, but damn if I don’t wish we had more green space.)
Can we shift to renewable energy? Yes. As to how…
Tar sands resistance escalates in Massachusetts.
The least sustainable city: Phoenix as a harbinger for our hot future.
-Awesomeness: in Cincinnati, an urban farming oasis is saved from the bulldozer blade.
-It’s time for slow money.
This piece about a potential upcoming economic crash is convincing, and scary. Our economic system needs to be rebuilt, but that’s not going to happen without some pretty bad shit happening first. And I’m not looking forward to that.

Everything Else
-I’m totally going to try this idea for hanging plates.
-A  thoughtful piece on Michelle Shocked, mental illness, Christian fundamentalism, and sexual identity.
Why that list of the “40 hottest women in tech” is absolutely disgusting. You tell ’em, Lesley!
On coming out as a Nigerian boi.
No more Steubenvilles: how to raise boys to be kind men.
Glorious takedowns of #safetytipsforladies.

More thinking about the commercialization of fatshion

(Earlier posts here, here, here, and here.)

I read another interesting response to Natalie’s piece, from Kath of Fat Heffalump. She argues that:

Fatshion is so much  more than mainstream fashion up-sized to fit a size 16 or 18.  Fatshion belongs to us, not to the fashion industry.  Fatshion will always be outside the margins, and will always be radical.  Fatshion belongs to here and now, not the past.  Fatshion is about finding your own style and rocking the hell out of it, flying in the face of a world that tells us we should never be seen.

I don’t agree with the premise that fatshion is always radical–I think that it, like almost anything else, can be co-opted. When fatshion becomes all about following trends, having the latest popular pieces, stoking an endless cycle of consumerist desires…then yeah. Not so radical. It’s a fine line, but I’ve seen a lot of fatshion going on that direction, and I’ve experienced that consumerist pull myself. It’s really tricky, and I don’t think that fatshion should be inherently immune from criticism.

But I do agree that there’s an amazing diversity of fatshion blogs, beyond the big names and the more commercially-oriented smaller names (some of who do have awesome style). And I agree that those bloggers shouldn’t be conflated with the small elite world of professional fatshionistas.

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Twitter takes on fatshion blogging, capitalism, and revolution

I’ve been doing all sorts of thinking and reading about Natalie’s post, which I wrote about yesterday. This shit’s complex.

The most interesting analyses I’ve read have all been on Twitter. Contrary to the stereotype that Twitter’s all about what people ate for lunch, there are important discussions happening there.

Marianne Kirby‘s written some especially good stuff (read from bottom to top):

I really like this tweet from Natalie herself:

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And the ethics of fatshion get even more complicated…

Natalie Perkins—fatshionista, writer, and creator of the iconic fat necklace–has a very interesting piece up on XoJane.

Titled “When activism gave way to advertising: how fat girl blogging ate itself,” it argues…well, exactly what the title says.

Fatshion blogs have largely evolved to be in step with large clothing brands, and I fear that the joining of oppressed and oppressor in brand relationships is not furthering fat activism. I don’t begrudge authors of blogs deriving an income from advertising, but I’m concerned with the increasing hand that brands have in blog content.

My feelings about all of this are complicated, but first of all, I admire Natalie for speaking up. She’s an amazing writer, and it takes guts to criticize a such a popular model of blogging.

When I have many conflicted thoughts about something (as I often do–ever heard the saying that between two Jews, there are three opinions?), I find it helps to number them. So, here goes.

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